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Definition: technology
     
           #3591   Created 04/15/2014   Updated 11/20/2015

google tech·nol·o·gy tek?näl?j?/ noun noun: technology; plural noun: technologies

1. the application of scientific knowledge for practical purposes, esp. in industry. "advances in computer technology" 2. Technology as Manufacturing ================== -- American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed., 200

from Greek tekhnologia, systematic treatment of an art or craft : tekhne, skill . . . .

1a. The application of science, especially to industrial or commercial objectives. b. The scientific method and material used to achieve a commercial or industrial objective. 2. Electronic or digital products and systems considered as a group. . . . 3. Anthropology The body of knowledge available to a society that is of use in fashioning implements, practicing manual arts and skills, and extracting or collecting materials.

0.

============================= urbandictionary.com 0. Technology as Social Usage. Our rules for driving are a kind of social technology imposed on top of the hardware of the car.

1) The application of science, math, engineering, art, and other fields of knowledge to create tools and implementations deemed useful by a society. The simultaneous actions of 45 people forming an orchestra are also a kind of technology that binds together instruments, people, and music

2) Anything that has to do with computers. Often misused by stupid people and corporations that market to said stupid people.

================= http://donteatthefruit.com/2009/12/defining-the-word-%E2%80%9Ctechnology%E2%80%9D-%E2%80%A6-four-times/

1. Technology as Hardware – this is the basic level that most of us mean when we use the word “technology.” As a piece of hardware, basically things do not occur “naturally”.

2. Technology as manufacturing includes the entire process (or “sociotechnical system”). This conception of technology was largely non-existent before the Industrial Revolution.

3. Technology as Methodology, the routines, methods, and skills used to make modern hardware. we are putting together a set of actions, and making it a way of doing things – a technique. Ellul criticized this aspect of modern technological society because it makes efficiency the highest good above humanity, community, fellowship, and other values central to a Christian conception of God’s purpose for human life.

0. Technology as Social Usage. The way that you are reading this blog post (on a website, in a feed reader, etc.) and the idea that you might comment and I might reply are all social processes built on top of and intimately connected to the hardware, the underlying manufacturing, and even the technological knowledge of blogging.

================== http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/technology tech·nol·o·gy [tek-nol-uh-jee] Show IPA noun 1. the branch of knowledge that deals with the creation and use of technical means and their interrelation with life, society, and the environment, drawing upon such subjects as industrial arts, engineering, applied science, and pure science. 2. the terminology of an art, science, etc.; technical nomenclature. 3. a scientific or industrial process, invention, method, or the like. 4. the sum of the ways in which social groups provide themselves with the material objects of their civilization. ====================== wikipedia Technology (from Greek ?????, techne, "art, skill, cunning of hand"; and -?????, -logia[1]) is the making, modification, usage, and knowledge of tools, machines, techniques, crafts, systems, and methods of organization, in order to solve a problem, improve a pre-existing solution to a problem, achieve a goal, handle an applied input/output relation or perform a specific function. It can also refer to the collection of such tools, including machinery, modifications, arrangements and procedures. Technologies significantly affect human as well as other animal species' ability to control and adapt to their natural environments. The term can either be applied generally or to specific areas: examples include construction technology, medical technology, and information technology. ========================================== oxford 1. The application of scientific knowledge for practical purposes, especially in industry: 2. Machinery and devices developed from scientific knowledge:

3. The branch of knowledge dealing with engineering or applied sciences. they comment:http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/august-2013-update/:

"Technology remains a catalyst for emerging words and is reflected in new entries including MOOC (‘massive open online course’: a course of study made available over the Internet without charge to a very large number of people); bitcoin (a digital currency in which transactions can be performed without the need for a central bank), and the compound Internet of things (a development of the Internet in which everyday objects have network connectivity). Other technology-related words added in this update include click and collect, BYOD (‘bring your own device’), and hackerspace." =============================== webopedia a) The application of science, especially to industrial or commercial objectives. (b) The scientific method and material used to achieve a commercial or industrial objective. ============================ http://web.engr.oregonstate.edu/~funkk/Technology/technology.html The word technology comes from two Greek words, transliterated techne and logos. Techne means art, skill, craft, or the way, manner, or means by which a thing is gained. Logos means word, the utterance by which inward thought is expressed, a saying, or an expression. So, literally, technology means words or discourse about the way things are gained.

==================================== Interesting christian values website found at Oregon state university

http://web.engr.oregonstate.edu/~funkk/Technology/technology.html

Etymology The word technology comes from two Greek words, transliterated techne and logos. Techne means art, skill, craft, or the way, manner, or means by which a thing is gained. Logos means word, the utterance by which inward thought is expressed, a saying, or an expression. So, literally, technology means words or discourse about the way things are gained. Contemporary Usage Lately, technology has come to mean something different. In one respect, the term has come to mean something narrower -- the above definition would admit art or politics as means of gain, yet though those activities are permeated by technology now, most of us would not consider them to be examples or subsets of technology. In another respect, this definition is too narrow, for when most of us speak of technology today, we mean more than just discourse about means of gain. Working Definitions In this essay I will refer to technology in five different senses. Following are some working definitions.

the technological process

First, technology is the rational process of creating means to order and transform matter, energy, and information to realize certain valued ends. The significance of this definition will become clearer below.

technological objects

Second, technology is the set of means (tools, devices, systems, methods, procedures) created by the technological process. Technological objects range from toothbrushes to transportation systems.

technological knowledge

Third, technology is the knowledge that makes the technological process possible. It consists of the facts and procedures necessary to order and manipulate matter, energy, and information, as well as how to discover new means for such transformations.

a technology

Fourth, a technology is a subset of related technological objects and knowledge. Computer technology and medical technology are examples of technologies.

the technological system

Finally, technology is the system consisting of the technological process, technological objects, technological knowledge, developers of technological objects, users of technological objects, and the worldview (i.e., the beliefs about things and the value of things that shape how one views the world) that has emerged from and drives the technological process. This is what Ellul referred to as the technological system. In the remainder of this article, I will use all five senses, but when I use the term technology by itself, I mean the fifth and most comprehensive sense.

===============================================

http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/technology.html

The purposeful application of information in the design, production, and utilization of goods and services, and in the organization of human activities.

Technology is generally divided into five categories

Tangible: blueprints, models, operating manuals, prototypes. Intangible: consultancy, problem-solving, and training methods. High: entirely or almost entirely automated and intelligent technology that manipulates ever finer matter and ever powerful forces. Intermediate: semiautomated partially intelligent technology that manipulates refined matter and medium level forces. Low: labor-intensive technology that manipulates only coarse or gross matter and weaker forces.

Read more: http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/technology.html#ixzz2yyf9geCe

================================================== http://www.thefreedictionary.com/technology

tech·nol·o·gy (t?k-n?l??-j?) n. pl. tech·nol·o·gies 1. a. The application of science, especially to industrial or commercial objectives. b. The scientific method and material used to achieve a commercial or industrial objective. 2. Electronic or digital products and systems considered as a group: a store specializing in office technology. 3. Anthropology The body of knowledge available to a society that is of use in fashioning implements, practicing manual arts and skills, and extracting or collecting materials.

============================== disruptive technology

Disruptive technology is a term coined by Harvard Business School professor Clayton M. Christensen to describe a new technology that unexpectedly displaces an established technology.

In his 1997 best-selling book, "The Innovator's Dilemma," Christensen separates new technology into two categories: sustaining and disruptive. Sustaining technology relies on incremental improvements to an already established technology. Disruptive technology lacks refinement, often has performance problems because it is new, appeals to a limited audience, and may not yet have a proven practical application. (Such was the case with Alexander Graham Bell's "electrical speech machine," which we now call the telephone.)

In his book, Christensen points out that large corporations are designed to work with sustaining technologies. They excel at knowing their market, staying close to their customers, and having a mechanism in place to develop existing technology. Conversely, they have trouble capitalizing on the potential efficiencies, cost-savings, or new marketing opportunities created by low-margin disruptive technologies. Using real-world examples to illustrate his point, Christensen demonstrates how it is not unusual for a big corporation to dismiss the value of a disruptive technology because it does not reinforce current company goals, only to be blindsided as the technology matures, gains a larger audience and market share and threatens the status quo.



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